Character Creation

Character Creation Quick Guide

Here is a Quick Guide to character creation.
We will be having a creation session, but I wanted to post this here to give you a head start.
Since it is pretty useful to have our characters up on the portal, but it doesn’t recognize Fear Itself as a common game, I have provided two ways to get your characters up.

1. Use the Blank Character Template and copy/paste into your character page.
2. Print a copy of the Character Sheets, and type the information into your character page.

Either way, to create a character, follow the steps below:

1. Premise.
All of the player characters are familiar with Robert Monroe-Tyler. He was with all of you on That Night. You have recently learned of his unexpected death and it is a bit of a shock.
Read the information in The Teaser, Omaha, and Invitation to learn more about the starting premise and setting. Keep these things in mind when building your character.

2. Concept.
Choose a concept. The characters are all regular people. The best concepts to describe them are quick and punchy, usually consisting of an adjective and noun or other short phrase. Here are some examples, but feel free to come up with your own: surly barista, drunken writer, depressed accountant, perky waitress, extroverted cabbie, intense scientist, gregarious preacher, nervous professor, arrogant salesman, wealthy art collector…you get the idea.
Some people prefer to put the character details together first and then return to summarize the concept. That’s fine, too.
The only restrictions on concept are on psychic and combat concepts. The group may only have one Psychic or Combat Expert each. While these concepts do allow some minor bonuses related to abilities, there are drawbacks as well. Speak to the ST if you are interested in playing the group’s psychic or combat expert.

3. Risk Factor.
Many horror games have the same primary challenge: what on earth causes the characters to delve deeper into a clearly horrifying situation? For you, that is your risk factor. This is a basic component of your character’s psyche that motivates you to risk horrific encounters. When your character is faced with a situation that triggers your risk factor, you must plunge deeper into jeopardy or suffer a Stability loss (more on stability later).
Some examples of risk factors are:
- Curious – when confronted by a mystery, you can’t help but investigate.
- Dismissive – you are certain bad things only happen to others.
- Drug Fiend – you’ll take any stupid risk if it means a chance to get high.
- Greed – you’ll take any risk if there is significant profit for you.
- Horny – When faced with the opportunity for caution or sexual adventure, your libido wins every time.
- Bravo – you react to danger with glee and see it as an opportunity to exercise violence upon others, human or not.
- Oblivious – you don’t seek out danger as much as you have the bad habit of stumbling into it unawares.
- Protective – Thoughts of your own safety mean little when others are at risk.
- Thrill Seeker – Danger is your middle name. Bring it on.
- Vengeful – You forget or downgrade any risks you face when pursuing retribution from a hurt.

4. Dark Secret.
All of the characters have a dark secret that cause them guilt and maybe, an opportunity for redemption through the course of the story. Fill out the section titled, “The Worst Thing I Ever Did” with a short phrase describing your dark secret.

5. Investigative Abilities.
Each player has 10 points to spend on any ability in the Academic, Interpersonal and/or Technical sections. It is usually a good idea to converse with the other players to ensure that the abilities everyone deems most critical are covered by the group.
The following investigative abilities are capped: Investigative Procedure and all abilities listed in the Psychic Powers section. If you are not the group’s resident combat expert, the maximum value you can ever purchase in Investigative Procedure is half the value that the combat expert has invested in it. Only the group’s psychic expert can take psychic powers at all.

6. General Abilities.
Each player has 60 points to spend on abilities in the General section. Notice that Health and Stability are both in this section. One method of prioritizing these points is to spend 8-12 on Health and Stability and then spend about 8 points on three or four highlight skills, spreading the rest around as you see fit. When in doubt, Fleeing is a good investment.
The following general abilities are capped: Scuffling and Shooting. If you are not the group’s resident combat expert, the maximum value you can ever purchase in that ability is half the value that the combat expert has invested in it.

7. Sources of Stability.
For every three points of stability you have, you must detail who or what serves as a stabilizing factor for you. These can be personality traits, activities or people. Some examples include Stoic, Emotionally Resilient, Sense of Humor, Painting, Singing, Praying, Joanie: Youngest sister, Christopher: Artist living in my rental house, Dr. Kendran: Therapist I see every Tuesday.

8. Personal Goal.
Select a personal goal for your character. This goal should be fairly short-term (6 months or less), and the best goals usually involve the people selected for your sources of stability or require growth/change on the part of your character or others. Some examples include raising funds for church repairs, getting into college, getting your lover off heroin, disproving the false accusations against you.

9. Affinity.
Since the characters are somewhat familiar with one another from their prior encounter, we will do character introductions on the first night of play. After hearing all of the introductions, decide which character your character likes best and write it in the Affinity section along with a reason why. As humans, we tend to agree with the opinions of people we already like. Making this note can be helpful for RP in the course of the game, but there is no associated mechanic.

10. Enmity.
Since the characters are somewhat familiar with one another from their prior encounter, we will do character introductions on the first night of play. After hearing all of the introductions, decide which character your character dislikes most and write it in the Enmity section along with a reason why. As humans, we tend to disagree with the opinions of people we already dislike. Making this note can be helpful for RP in the course of the game, but there is no associated mechanic.

Character Creation

Fear Itself AlysenFicklin